Reformation to Revolution
12
October
2017
01
April
2019

Reformation to Revolution

United Kingdom Scotland Edinburgh
1 Queen St, Edinburgh EH2 1JD, UK

13-18 Oct, 20-25, 27-31 Oct, 1, 3-8, 10-15, 17-22, 24-29 Nov, 1-6 Dec, 8-13, 15-20, 22-24, 27, 29-31 Dec, 2-3 Jan 2018, 5-10, 12-17, 19-24, 26-31 Jan 2018, 2-7 Feb 2018, 9-14, 16-21, 23-28 Feb 2018, 2-7 Mar 2018, 9-14, 16-21, 23-28, 30-31 Mar 2018, 1-4 Apr 2018, 6-11, 13-18, 20-25, 27-30 Apr 2018, 1-2 May 2018, 4-9, 11-16, 18-23, 25-30 May 2018, 1-6 Jun 2018, 8-13, 15-20, 22-27, 29-30 Jun 2018, 1-4 Jul 2018, 6-11, 13-18, 20-25, 27-31 Jul 2018, 1, 3-8, 10-15, 17-22, 24-29, 31 Aug 2018, 1-5 Sep 20



After 1603 the Stuarts, now based in London, were absentee rulers, and the nature of kingship was itself increasingly contested. The huge upheavals of the Reformation saw Protestantism become the nation’s official religion. The collapse of the old church and the dispersal of its lands and wealth brought about a major shift of power and income: new landed classes vied with established noble families for status and influence.

These complex changes had important cultural consequences. With religious painting no longer acceptable, there was an increase in demand for secular art forms, portraiture in particular. This coincided with a growing merchant and professional class beginning to commission works of art to display their increased ambition and economic strength.

Painted portraits were expensive, and those who acquired them came from the wealthiest levels of society, both old and new. These men and women used portraits to assert ideas of social status as well as to record an individual likeness. Their images played a significant role in the struggles for power, identity and nationhood during this period.

Website: http://www.nationalgalleries.org/visit/introduction-298
PRICE: £0
DIRECTIONS: Scottish National Portrait Gallery, 1 Queen Street, Edinburgh, EH2 1JD
SOURCE: www.visitscotland.com
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